Ping Pong Diplomacy

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfMRq2Of_Qw]

This week marks the anniversary of one of the most surprising, unusual and ultimately significant moments in the history of China’s foreign relations: 乒乓外交 (pīngpāng wàijiāo), usually known in English as “ping-pong diplomacy”, the landmark trip by the US table tennis team to China in 1971 that eventually led to a visit by US President Richard Nixon to China and the gradual tempering of relations between the two countries.

(Read more about this story at ChinesePod.)

Using Word’s referencing tools

If you missed the lecture where I went through the proposal template you might be confused about the blank bibliography at the end that says “no sources”. This will get updated as you add references, so long as you use Word’s built-in citation tools.

I’ve written a tutorial on using these tools and posted it as a page which you can read here. Bear in mind that this assumes you’re starting from scratch and in the template I’ve already inserted the bibliography for you. All you need to do is add references and then update the bibliography. I’ll try to post a video soon but in the meantime, look at the example proposal in Dropbox.

Tomb Sweeping Festival

TombSweeping

China is currently having a three-day public holiday and 4th April is the Qingming Festival, or Tomb-Sweeping Festival. Chinese communities across Asia visit the graves of their families to pay respects and this begins with a thorough cleaning, hence the name.

The BBC News website has some images from the ritual.

It is traditional to burn representations of things the deceased may need in the afterlife, such as paper money. Over time these have become much more elaborate and you can buy paper houses, paper furniture and paper phones. In this image, a relative is burning a paper iPad, iPod Nano and iPhone for their relative to use in heaven.

PaperiPad

Using Cross Search

Cross Search

CrossSearch is the University of Dundee’s database for journal, magazine and newspaper articles. It’s useful for quickly surveying what’s available in a particular area, then accessing PDFs or physical copies of things you’re interested in.

Using CrossSearch for the first time can be tricky but once you’re used to it, it’s a piece of cake. The trick really is to select the right database, then choose useful key words to search for.

I’ve put a tutorial on using Cross Search elsewhere on the site – follow this link.

You’ll probably need to use Cross Search either for assignment 5, or for next semester’s research project – so take some time to go through the tutorial and have a practice run with it.